Q. Is anemia common in pregnancy?

Answered by
Dr. Prakash H Muddegowda
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Aug 05, 2016 and last reviewed on: Jun 29, 2020

Hello doctor,

I am a 30 year old woman. I am 22 weeks pregnant. I have had blood work done today, which came out normal except for the following values. Hemoglobin 10.8 (11.7-15.5), RBC 3.79 (3.8-5), hematocrit 32% (35-45) and reticulocyte production index 0.72. My serum iron is normal at 56 (50-170). I have noticed my RBC and hemoglobin levels dropping during the last two three months. My RBC and hemoglobin were 5.1 and 14 respectively for many years. They were the same even when I was 18 weeks pregnant last year, but I lost that pregnancy. Is this anemia typical of pregnancy or should I worry about some marrow disease? I am a bit of a hypochondriac and that reticulocyte index being low makes me apprehensive. What treatment should I follow?

#

Hi,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

Based on your query, my opinion is as follows:

  • The hemoglobin levels do fall during pregnancy.
  • Due to increased fluids in the body, hemodilution will occur and overall hemoglobin levels will fall. This is one of the protective responses to reduce too much loss of blood, if any during pregnancy.
  • The normal level during pregnancy is around 10.5 g%. Therefore, the reticulocyte production index is within the normal range. So, no need to worry.
  • No need to worry about hemoglobin, it is normal. Continue with balanced diet and nutrition. Avoid stress and relax.

For further information consult a hematologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/hematologist


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