Common "Left Ventricular Hypertrophy" queries answered by top doctors | iCliniq

Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

The thickening of the walls of the left ventricle (the lower left chamber of the heart) is called left ventricular hypertrophy. High blood pressure, aortic valve stenosis, prolonged athletic training, and genetic heart diseases increase the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy. Its symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

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I have been suffering from various symptoms. Kindly help.

Query: Hi doctor, I have been experiencing a wide variety of symptoms for the past year like fatigue, muscle and body aches, brain fog/forgetfulness, vertigo, headaches, heat intolerance, episodes of feeling shakey (blood sugar is normal), bowel changes (constipation), episodes of nausea, trouble sleeping,...  Read Full »


Dr. Zulfiqar Ahmed

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. I am sorry to hear you are going through a lot. Your symptoms are varied and involve many systems. In terms of endocrine, you mentioned your thyroid function tests are fine. I would like to exclude pheochromocytoma and carcinoid syndrome along with any neuroendocrine tu...  Read Full »

Based on my latest ECG, do you think I need an echocardiogram for LVH?

Query: Hello doctor, I had an ECG (electrocardiogram) done three years ago, which showed up LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy), so I went and got an echocardiogram done, and it was normal. I had an ECG done again last week, and my doctor said it is still showing up LVH but more severe than three years ago....  Read Full »


Dr. Sagar Ramesh Makode

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. I have seen your reports (attachments removed to protect patient identity). How much do you weigh, and how is your built? (your weight is incorrect in your medical records). Now, if you are lean and thin, everything is normal because ECG can show left ventricular hyp...  Read Full »

Can an ECG detect LVH?

Query: Hi doctor,I am a 37-year-old female. Three years ago, I had an ECG done, and it showed up LVH. So I had an echocardiogram, and there was no evidence of LVH. I had another ECG last week in the hospital, and it showed up LVH again, worse. And I am so scared. Can the echocardiogram change in three year...  Read Full »


Dr. Muhammad Zohaib Siddiq

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. ECG (electrocardiogram) is not reliable for detecting LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy). An echocardiogram is the best test for it. ECG may show LVH patterns in thin, lean persons. If the echocardiogram is normal, then no need to worry. Do you have hypertension? What a...  Read Full »

I have LVH and my resting heart rate around 40. Please help.

Query: Hello doctor, I was diagnosed with severe LVH due to anabolic steroid abuse the past two and a half years and training for more than three hours a day. I have made lifestyle changes and lost weight but my anxiety now gets the better of me. I have a family history of bradycardia my RHR is 40s and h...  Read Full »


Dr. Ilir Sharka

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. I passed carefully through your history and would like to reassure you that there is no reason to panic, as long as you have stopped physical training and anabolic steroids intake. You should know that LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy) is quite reversible in such a...  Read Full »

What causes chest tightness, sweaty palms, and uneasiness?

Query: Hi doctor,My son-in-law aged 44 years, slightly overweight, had symptoms of tightness of chest, sweaty palm and uneasiness. The tests showed blood pressure reading as 140/80 mmHg and ECG showed left ventricle irregularity. Please advise.  Read Full »


Dr. Rishu Sharma

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. Left ventricular hypertrophy is because of hypertension, however, ECG (electrocardiogram) is just a baseline test of cardiology. The tightness of chest associated with sweating can be stable angina. Stable angina is chest pain or discomfort that most often occurs with a...  Read Full »

My son's ECG shows left ventricular hypertrophy. What to do?

Query: Hi doctor, My son is 12 years old, very active, plays representative basketball and attends a sports high school. Last Sunday, he was knocked over while playing and hurt his arm. After getting up, he fainted. He was fine after that. There were no broken bones, but the medical center did an ECG, and ...  Read Full »


Dr. Sagar Ramesh Makode

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. The ECG (electrocardiogram) is showing incomplete RBBB (right bundle branch block) or early RBBB and features of left ventricular hypertrophy, and also heart rate is on lower side nearing 60 beats per minute. But as you mentioned, he is a basketball player. So, athle...  Read Full »

Can left ventricular hypertrophy be genetic?

Query: Hi doctor, My mother died four months ago, due to cardiac arrhythmia which was caused by left ventricular hypertrophy. Can I know whether left ventricular hypertrophy is hereditary as I am frightened for me and for my children?  Read Full »


Dr. Sagar Ramesh Makode

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. Hypertrophy is a general term and it includes multiple individual diseases. Do you have her echo report or any other medical reports of the heart? The first possibility in her case is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is certainly hereditary and all the first degree...  Read Full »

I have high BP and chest pain. What medicines should I take?

Query: Hello doctor, I am 31 years old with a weight of 191 pounds and height of 5 feet 7 inches. I have a problem of high BP. There is little chest pain. ECG report (leftward axis). Echo report (mild concentric LVH and diastolic dysfunction and normal systolic function). LVEF 60 %. Total cholesterol 213. ...  Read Full »


Dr. Nishith Chandra

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. I have seen your reports (attachment removed to protect the patient's identity). Your echo is almost normal. Your current medicines appear to control your BP adequately. So, there is no need to change them. But your weight of 191 pounds for your height of 5 feet ...  Read Full »

Will quitting alcohol and cigarettes improve my blood tests?

Query: Hello doctor, I am suffering from hypertension since few years, and I am currently on medication Telmisartan. I am an alcoholic and smoker, and I smoke approximately 15 cigarettes a day for the last five years. My current CBC report suggests high RBC, hemoglobin, and PCV. Though it reduced slightly ...  Read Full »


Dr. Goswami Parth Rajendragiri

Answer: Hi,Welcome to icliniq.com.I have gone through your attached reports (attachment removed to protect patient identity).The diagnosis is polycythemia. Polycythemia can be secondary or primary. Secondary polycythemia occurs because of hypoxia, which activates the oxygen sensor and more erythropoietin is...  Read Full »

How to manage high blood pressure and weight?

Query: Hello doctor, I am a 32-year-old male and weigh 308 kg. I always have a high blood pressure of 150/90 mmHg while meeting the doctor. The doctor always thought it was due to my anxiety. The echocardiogram results showed normal left ventricular size and function, LVEF 60 to 65 %, grade 1 diastolic dy...  Read Full »


Dr. Mahmoud Ahmed Abdelrahman Abouibrahim

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. I have checked the attached report (attachment removed to protect patient identity). The echocardiography report shows mild enlargement of the left ventricle (the chamber responsible for pumping the blood to the body) due to high pressure. It is a mild enlargement an...  Read Full »

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