Cholesterol Ratio Calculator

The functioning of this tool and the content on this page have been verified by iCliniq medical review team.


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Cholesterol is a fatty substance and is essential for the normal functioning of the body. This is mainly produced by the liver; however, it can also be found in some foods. An increase in the level of cholesterol usually does not cause any symptoms, but there can be an upsurge in the risk of serious health conditions. Cholesterol needs to be measured at least once every five years in all ages over 20. Lipid disorders need to be screened for men ages 33 and older and women ages 43 and older.

Cholesterol is carried in your blood by proteins. When the two combine, they are called lipoproteins. The types of lipoproteins are HDL (high-density lipoprotein), LDL (low-density lipoprotein), and triglycerides (TG).

The high-density lipoprotein transports cholesterol away from the cells and brings them back to the liver where it is either broken down or excreted out of the body as a waste product. Hence, for this reason, HDL is also known as "good cholesterol," and higher levels of HDL are desirable.

The HDL risk levels are categorized into:

High Risk - where the HDL is below 40 mg/dL

Borderline - where the HDL is between 40 mg/dL and 59 mg/dL

Optimal - where the HDL is 60 mg/dL and above

The low-density lipoprotein transports cholesterol to the cells that need it, but if there is already more cholesterol for the cells to use, it can accumulate in the artery walls leading to a disease of the arteries. This can lead to serious heart conditions. Hence, for this reason, LDL is also called as "bad cholesterol."

The LDL risk levels are categorized into:

Very High - where the LDL level is 190 mg/dL and above.

High - where the LDL level is between 160 mg/dL and 189 mg/dL

Borderline High - where the LDL is between 130 mg/dL and 159 mg/dL

Near Optimal - where the LDL is between 100 mg/dL and 129 mg/dL

Optimal - where the LDL is below 100 mg/dL

Both HDL and LDL can be measured with a blood test. The suggested cholesterol levels in the blood differ between those with an inflated or deflated risk of developing arterial diseases.

Triglycerides are the most usual type of fat the body has. They store surplus energy from the food that we eat. Therefore, a high triglyceride level can lead to diseases of the arteries. This raises the risk of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

The TG risk levels are categorized into:

Very High - where the TG level is 500 mg/dL and above

High - where the TG level is between 200 mg/dL and 499 mg/dL

Borderline High - where the TG level is between 150 mg/dL and 199 mg/dL

Normal - where the TG level is below 150 mg/dL.

Thus, with the help of this Cholesterol Ratio Calculator many popular cholesterol ratios like TC/HDL, LDL/HDL, TG/HDL can be calculated. These ratios play an indispensable role in determining the level of treatment for patients with heart ailments.


Measurement Unit
 
High Density Lipoprotein (HDL)
 
Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)
 
Triglyceride (TG)

 
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How are the cholesterol ratios calculated?


The Total Cholesterol is just a combination of good and bad cholesterol in your blood. It does not give much information about any heart disease risks.

The total cholesterol can be calculated using the below-mentioned formula:

TC = HDL in mg/dL + LDL in mg/dL + (0.2 * TG in mg/dL)

At first, the triglyceride is multiplied by 0.2 and the result is then added to the HDL and the LDL levels to give us the Total Cholesterol level.

The TC levels are categorized into:
  • High - where the TC is 240 mg/dL and above
  • Borderline High - where the TC is between 200 mg/dL and 239 mg/dL
  • Desirable - where the TC is below 200 mg/dL

Total Cholesterol/HDL (TC/HDL) Ratio:

TC/HDL ratio = TC in mg/dL / HDL in mg/dL

The TC/HDL ratio risk levels are categorized into:
  • Bad - where the TC/HDL ratio is 5 and over
  • Good - where the TC/HDL ratio is between 3.5 and 5.0
  • Ideal - where the TC/HDL ratio is below 3.5

LDL/HDL ratio:

LDL/HDL ratio = LDL in mg/dL / HDL in mg/dL

The LDL/HDL ratio risk levels are categorized into:
  • Too High - where LDL/HDL ratio is 5 and above
  • Good - where LDL/HDL ratio is between 2.0 and 5.0
  • Ideal - where LDL/HDL ratio is below 2.0

Triglyceride/HDL (TG/HDL) ratio :

TG/HDL ratio = TG in mg/dL / HDL in mg/dL

The TG/HDL ratio risk levels are categorized into:
  • Too High - where the TG/HDL ratio is 4 and above
  • High - where the TG/HDL ratio is between 2 and 4
  • Ideal - where the TG/HDL ratio is 2 or below

If the measurements are available in mmol/L, they are converted into mg/dL using the below conversion method:

  • For total cholesterol (TC), HDL, and LDL cholesterol multiply the mmol/L value with 38.67. The result will be a value in mg/dL
  • For triglycerides (TG) multiply the value in mmol/L by 88.57 and this will give the triglycerides in mg/dL
 


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