liver diseases

Acute and Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

Written by
Dr. Babu Lal Meena
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.

Published on Jan 18, 2019 and last reviewed on Oct 10, 2019   -  1 min read

Abstract

Abstract

Hepatitis B is a virus that predominantly affects the liver. Infection of hepatitis B may be cleared from the body and may go to chronic infection. Chronic hepatitis B may cause chronic liver damage and liver cirrhosis. Hepatitis B may cause liver cancer in a small proportion of infected patients.

Acute and Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

Overview:

Hepatitis B is the virus that predominantly affects the liver. There are various routes of hepatitis B infection. The important causes of infection are contaminated needle prick, blood transfusions from an infected individual, unprotected sex, and maternal to child transmission.

Infection of hepatitis B may be cleared from the body and may go to chronic infection. In the majority of the patients, it gets cleared within 6 months of infection. For a few patients when it is not cleared from the circulation in the first 6 months, it usually clears by the end of a year. It rarely gets cleared after a year of infection.

Acute Hepatitis B Infection:

Acute infection (infection less than 6 months), may or may not cause any harm to the liver. The grade of effect on the liver is varied, most of the time it does not cause significant harm. In a small number of cases, it causes acute hepatitis-like symptoms, and rarely it causes acute liver failure. The treatment of acute hepatitis is required in the case of acute liver failure or acute liver injury.

Chronic Hepatitis B Infection:

If hepatitis B persists in the blood even after 6 months of infection, it is called as a chronic infection. Chronic hepatitis B may cause chronic liver damage and liver cirrhosis. Hepatitis B may cause liver cancer in a small proportion of the infected patient. Patients of chronic hepatitis B require treatment, which depends on multiple biomarkers, patient's clinical condition, and family history of hepatocellular malignancy.

Diagnosis:

Diagnosis of hepatitis B is made by detection of HBsAg, HBV DNA, HBeAg, anti-HBe, etc. Grading of the severity of liver disease is done by non-invasive (fibroscan, ultrasound) and invasive (liver biopsy) methods.

Last reviewed at:
10 Oct 2019  -  1 min read

RATING

15
Ask a QueryAsk a Query Consult by PhoneConsult by Phone Video ChatVideo Chat

Tags:

Comprehensive Medical Second Opinion.Submit your Case

Related Questions & Answers


My spleen is enlarged, and CBC is normal. Please help.

Query: Hello doctor,I have enlarged spleen from the last two years. I am 24 years old, male. My spleen size went from 13.4 cm two years back to 14 cm to 14.4 cm four months back. My CBC report looks normal and I have vitamin B12 level as 349 and vitamin D as 11.13. I have MCV level 102.4 and MCH level 34.2...  Read Full »

Though my hepatitis report came negative, my urine is still red. Why?

Query: Hi doctor, Two years ago, I got chicken pox. Later, I started taking lots of oil items. As a consequence, I got jaundice. Exactly a year ago, I took a few tests and everything was under control except direct bilirubin level 0.4. Seven months later, whenever I urinated in the morning the color of my ...  Read Full »

Popular Articles Most Popular Articles

Do you have a question on Tests For Hepatitis or Hepatitis B Virus?

Ask a Doctor Online

* guaranteed answer within 4 hours.
Enter Your Health Query
You can upload files and images in the next step.

Fee:  

 


Disclaimer: All health articles published on this website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical diagnosis, advice or treatment by a trained physician. Seek the advice from your physician or other qualified health-care providers with questions you may have regarding your symptoms and medical condition for a complete medical diagnosis. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this website.