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HomeAnswersEndocrinologyhypoglycemiaLast week I had an episode of shaking, sweating, and weakness due to hypoglycemia. What to do?

Is it possible to have episodes of shaking, sweating, and weakness due to low blood sugar levels?

The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

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Published At April 3, 2022
Reviewed AtJanuary 12, 2023

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

I have had reactive hypoglycemia for one and a half years. I am taking the medication Synthroid 100 mcg, and I do not take any medication for hypoglycemia. I am usually pretty good at keeping it stable by eating small meals throughout the day. Last week I had an episode of shaking, sweating, and weakness (for 15 minutes) with a blood glucose of 45 mg/dL. I was unable to eat or do anything about the issue at the time. About 15 minutes later, I began to feel better. I rechecked my blood glucose, and it was at 80 mg/dL. I had no further problems that day. Was it possibly a wrong reading, or is this possible?

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

Yes, it is possible. You probably have insulin resistance, and as a result, more insulin production after a meal leads to hypoglycemia. I would suggest the following:

1. Get your fasting and postprandial glucose and insulin levels checked.

2. Weight loss will help.

3. Consume small frequent meals.

4. Consume less carbohydrates, more protein, and fat.

5. Avoid liquid calories.

You can also try medicines like Metformin or Acarbose after getting reports from the tests mentioned earlier.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Thiyagarajan. T
Dr. Thiyagarajan. T

Diabetology

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