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HomeAnswersNeurologycervical spondylosisI was suggested surgery for cervical spondylosis. Should I go for it?

I was suggested surgery for cervical spondylosis. Should I go for it?

The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

Medically reviewed by

iCliniq medical review team

Published At April 2, 2018
Reviewed AtAugust 29, 2023

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

I am a 53-year-old female. I am a cervical spondylosis patient. After the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) report, the doctor suggested an operation. Should I go with the operation or not? MRI report: Spine with the screening of the whole spine: Cervical spine was studied with 3 mm thin slices in the axial and sagittal plane. Both T1 and T2 weighted, and gradient echo images were obtained. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) coronal images were obtained. T2 weighted sagittal whole spine screening was also performed. There is a straightening of the cervical spine noted. Fusion of C3 and C4 vertebral bodies is seen - postoperative status. The rest of the cervical vertebrae reveals normal marrow signal intensity. Posterior disc osteophyte complex is seen at the C4-C5 level, causing left neural foramina stenosis, indentation over the cord, and compression upon the left C5 nerve root. Posterior disc osteophyte complex is seen at the C5-C6 level, causing left neural foramina stenosis and compression upon the left C6 nerve root. The facet joints are unremarkable. The craniovertebral junction is unremarkable. The cord is of normal signal intensity. There is no fracture, dislocation, or erosion. Paravertebral soft tissues are normal. T2 weighted sagittal whole spine screening reveals intervertebral discs are of reduced signal intensity on T2 weighted images at all lumbar levels suggestive of disc desiccation. Disc bulges are seen from D5-D6 and L4-L5 levels. Impression: Cervical spondylosis as described above. Posterior disc osteophyte complex at C4-C5 level causing left neural foraminal stenosis, indentation over the cord, and compression upon left C5 nerve root. Posterior disc osteophyte complex at C5-C6 level causing left neural foraminal stenosis and compression on the left C6 nerve root. More details about the presenting complaint: Currently feeling numbness in left hand 60 % and in right hand 40 %. Previous history of the same issue: Operation for cervical spondylosis was carried out ten years back for C3-C4.

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com. If there is persistent numbness in the hands in cervical radiculopathy, then surgery is indicated. As you mentioned that you have significant numbness, and your MRI reports suggest the same, you should consider getting surgery done. Until then, you can be started on Duloxetine, Pregabalin, and a cervical collar. You may defer the surgery if your symptoms improve significantly with the mentioned medicine.

Patient's Query

Thank you, doctor,

I have been using Duloxetine and Pregabalin for the last six months, along with a cervical collar, but still, there is numbness in my hand. There is no pain, only numbness. Should I go for the operation as suggested by my doctor?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com. In that case, you should go for surgery. If you have any further queries, please ask me.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Anshul Varshney
Dr. Anshul Varshney

Internal Medicine

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