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HomeAnswersFetal MedicinehydronephrosisIs pregnancy safe in a woman who has hydronephrosis?

How does moderate bilateral hydronephrosis affect the foetus?

The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

Answered by

Dr. Deepti Verma

Medically reviewed by

iCliniq medical review team

Published At November 17, 2022
Reviewed AtOctober 11, 2023

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

This query is regarding my sister-in-law, who is 19 weeks pregnant. She had a routine USG yesterday that showed the fetus has moderate bilateral hydronephrosis. What could be the reason for this doctor? Should she continue the pregnancy or not? Will it be life-threatening for the kid after birth, or will it have lifelong complications? Is it treatable? I am attaching the report doctor. Kindly go through it and advise us. After trying for five years, it is a precious pregnancy, and there was a miscarriage in the last pregnancy in the first trimester. Kindly help us. Thank you.

Answered by Dr. Deepti Verma

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

I read your query and can understand your concern. I have reviewed the report (attachments removed to protect the patient's identity). Moderate hydronephrosis (a condition in which kidneys become swollen as a result of urine build up) can be due to chromosomal anomalies or mild reflux in the renal system. If there are no other anomalies in the fetus, then she should get a quadruple marker done. If the risk of Trisomy 21 and 18 is low, then there is nothing to worry about. The baby should get a postnatal ultrasound to confirm any pathology in the kidney. It is a minor anomaly, and you should not worry as there are high chances of spontaneous resolution. I hope this helps. Thank you and take care.

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

Thank you for your reply. My sisters quadruple marker test is already done, and results are expected. I am attaching the report for your review. The USG I sent earlier does not show any other anomaly, right? And if there is no spontaneous resolution, does the kid has to undergo surgery?

Answered by Dr. Deepti Verma

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

I read your query and can understand your concern. The serum screening is regular, as in the report. So, there is nothing to worry about. The treatment, whether required or not, will depend upon the cause. It may be a mild cause and will not need any treatment. It will depend upon the postnatal evaluation of the baby. I hope this helps. Thank you and take care.

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

Thank you for the reply. The USG was repeated for my sister-in-law, and a detailed USG was done. I am attaching the report (attachments removed to protect the patient's identity). Kindly review and give your advice. If there is an obstruction, will it cause oligohydramnios further in pregnancy? Also, it is manageable, right? After delivery? Any chance of long-term complications? Kindly review the report (attachments removed to protect the patient's identity)and advice. It will be beneficial.

Answered by Dr. Deepti Verma

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

I read your query and can understand your concern.

In this scan (attachments removed to protect the patient's identity), the renal pelvis dilatation is mild (less than 7 mm), and the amniotic fluid is adequate. There are no soft markers of chromosomal anomalies, so there is nothing to worry about at this stage. It is unlikely to cause any oligohydramnios in further gestation. Mild pyelectasis (a condition where urine gathers in the center of the kidney) is unlikely to cause any long-term complications in the baby. However, the same treatment is to be suggested only after the diagnosis. I hope this helps. Thank you and take care.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Deepti Verma
Dr. Deepti Verma

Fetal Medicine

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