Q. I have myopia and getting floaters in my left eye after YAG laser capsulotomy. Why?

Answered by
Dr. Vaibhev Mittal
and medically reviewed by Dr. Hemalatha
Published on Nov 26, 2019

Hello doctor,

I am a 38-year-old male. I have a family history of myopia and cataract. I had myopia since early childhood. I developed a cataract in both my eyes at the age of 32 and had them operated upon followed by an IOL in both the eyes. Soon after, in the same year, I developed opacification in my left eye and my doctor conducted a YAG laser capsulotomy to have the problem corrected. In this context, I wish to mention that I see several floaters in my left eye. Six years following my cataract surgery and IOL transplantation, I developed a blurry vision and a bubble in my right eye and my doctor diagnosed opacification in my right eye and conducted a YAG laser capsulotomy. Following the capsulotomy, my vision improved but the bubble is still there and it is causing a scattering of light vision in my right eye, more prominent when I am tilting my head towards the right.

My doctor says that the anatomical capsule holding on to the IOL in my right eye has weakened over the years and is causing the IOL to move inside my eye. This movement of the lens, coupled with the formation of the bubble is causing the scattering of light vision in my right eye. The doctor said that the bubble should disappear within or around six weeks of the capsulotomy. He also said that if the IOL gets dislodged or its movement causes too much of discomfort, then the solution would be to have the lens removed and replaced with an IOL with its own capacity to hold on to its position without depending on the anatomical capsule to hold it in its place.

My questions are: What is the reason for the appearance of the bubble in my right eye? As the doctor said, will it disappear within or around six weeks of the capsulotomy? Will I have a better vision if I go for a replacement of the IOL since it is moving? Is there a way to reduce floaters in the eye and to treat macular degeneration of the eye?

Dr. Vaibhev Mittal

Ophthalmology (Eye Care)
#

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

What is the exact meaning when you use this word "bubble"? After capsulotomy, capsular fragments start floating in vitreous leading to floaters. This sensation usually decreases with time and slowly over time the brain starts avoiding these images and the patient become comfortable after six to eight weeks after capsulotomy.

The decision of replacing the present lens with the scleral fixated lens is entirely dependent on your ophthalmologist. If the lens is in the pupillary axis, I would not suggest replacing it. If it is dislocated so that the pupil is without lens or lens is tilted a lot, in these conditions I would opt for replacing the present lens. There is no treatment for floaters. Just try to ignore them.

You did not give any history regarding macular degeneration, but again there is no treatment for macular degeneration. I need to see your reports. In case, if there is CNVM (choroidal neovascular membrane) at the macula, then you may need an intravitreal injection. Kindly send me your medical reports along with the test reports so that I may guide you better.


Was this answer helpful?

 | 

Ask a QueryAsk a Query Consult by PhoneConsult by Phone Video ChatVideo Chat
Also Read Answers From:

Comprehensive Medical Second Opinion.Submit your Case

Related Questions & Answers


My eyesight is getting worse and doctors say myopia cannot be cured. Is it true?

Query: Hello doctor,Before two years, my eyesight was perfect. But during that time only because of me using phone late night it started declining and now its R= >-2.25, L = >-2.00. I used '>' because I am currently not able to see that clearly with my current glasses. Within the span of three yea...  Read Full »

Popular

Popular

Ask your health query to a doctor online?

Ask an Eye Care Ophthalmologist Now

* guaranteed answer within 4 hours.
Enter Your Health Query
You can upload files and images in the next step.

Fee:  

 


Disclaimer: All health Q&As published on this website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical diagnosis, advice or treatment by a trained physician. Seek the advice from your physician or other qualified health-care providers with questions you may have regarding your symptoms and medical condition for a complete medical diagnosis. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this website.