iCliniq logo

Ask a Doctor Online Now

HomeHealth articlesstrokeWhat Is Right-Sided Stroke?

Right-Sided Stroke - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Verified dataVerified data
0

4 min read

Share

Right-sided stroke or right-brain stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is discontinued. This article is a brief overview of right-sided stroke.

Medically reviewed by

Dr. Isaac Gana

Published At October 18, 2022
Reviewed AtDecember 28, 2023

Introduction

A right-sided brain stroke occurs when the right side of the brain is completely devoid of blood and thus oxygen supply. The right brain helps in the normal functioning of the left body, whereas the left brain aids in the regular working of the right body. In addition to this, the right side of the brain is responsible for some amount of thought processing, the judgment of distance and space, and the positioning of the body.

A stroke is a condition of the brain when it does not receive blood supply and thus stops working. A stroke can affect the entire brain or a part of the brain. Additionally, strokes can affect the right side and the whole left side of the brain. There are many symptoms of a stroke. Right-sided stroke shows signs on the entire left side of the body and vice versa. The brain cells can immediately die due to a lack of oxygen supply. A stroke is a medical emergency.

What Are the Causes of Right-Sided Stroke?

Risks and complications due to stroke occur for a variety of underlying reasons. Strokes are standard in older adults and individuals with a family history of stroke. There are two kinds of stroke- an ischaemic stroke and a hemorrhagic stroke. An ischemic stroke is when blood flow is completely blocked. At the same time, a hemorrhagic stroke is when the artery of the brain starts bleeding and leaking blood into the brain. Many reasons may result in a stroke on the right side of the brain.

Mentioned below are a few of the causes of right-sided stroke.

  • A clot from another body part.

  • A lump in a brain vessel.

  • A tear in a vessel of the brain.

  • High blood pressure.

  • Over-treatment or overdose of blood thinners.

  • Severe trauma.

  • Aneurysm.

  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

  • Arteriovenous malformation.

  • Fatty deposits build up in blood vessels.

  • Covid-19 infection.

  • Smoking.

  • Tobacco consumption.

  • Second-hand smoking.

  • Atrial fibrillation.

  • Diabetes mellitus.

  • Overweight and obesity.

  • Family history of stroke.

  • Certain medications and allergies.

  • Sedentary lifestyle.

  • High levels of cholesterol.

  • Excessive consumption of alcohol.

  • Stress.

  • History of a heart attack.

  • Irregular Heartbeat or heart rhythm.

  • Conditions that affect the health of blood vessels.

  • Enlarged heart.

  • Carotid artery stenosis.

  • A diet rich in saturated fat.

  • Over intake of sodium.

  • A diet rich in trans fat.

  • Drug abuse from cocaine, amphetamines, and heroin.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of a Right-Sided Stroke?

Symptoms of a right-sided stroke are generally seen on the left side and left body parts. However, symptoms of a left-sided stroke are eventually caught on the right side of the body. It should be noted that the clinical manifestations of a stroke vary in individuals and depend on the underlying cause of the stroke and the type of stroke the individual has been affected with.

Mentioned below are some of the signs and symptoms of a right-sided stroke.

  • Sudden weakness of the face.

  • Liability of the arm or leg.

  • Severe dizziness.

  • Balance problems.

  • Difficulty walking.

  • Confusion.

  • Head pain.

  • Muscle loss on the left side of the body.

  • The vision is blurred.

  • Seeing issues from the left side of each eye.

  • Hearing problems.

  • Sensory changes on the left side of the body.

  • Problems with depth perception.

  • Not understanding directions.

  • Memory problems.

  • Difficulty in problem-solving.

  • Not able to make decisions.

  • Problems in breathing.

  • Problems chewing and swallowing.

  • Slurred way of speaking.

  • Drooping on the left side of the face.

  • Paralysis in the left side of the body.

  • Loss of consciousness.

  • Blinding pain.

  • Vertigo.

  • Generalized numbness.

  • Stiffness of muscles.

  • Rapid involuntary eye movement.

  • Reduced sensation of touch.

  • Pins and needles.

  • Overactive reflexes.

  • Fatigue.

  • Temporary loss of vision.

How to Diagnose a Right-Sided Stroke?

Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are vital in an episode of stroke. First, the patient's signs and symptoms should give the health care professional an idea that the individual has suffered a stroke. The side of the body that shows clinical manifestations should then make the health care provider aware of the side of the brain that has been affected.

Below are some of the diagnostic tools that may aid in the correct diagnosis of stroke.

  • Computerized tomography scan.

  • Angiogram.

  • Computerized tomography angiogram.

  • Magnetic resonance imaging scan.

  • Magnetic resonance angiography or MRA.

  • Doppler ultrasound.

  • Electrocardiogram or ECG.

  • Echocardiogram.

  • Cerebral angiography.

  • Carotid ultrasound.

  • Blood flow tests.

  • Electrical impulse tests.

  • Blood-borne biochemical markers.

How Is a Right-Sided Stroke Treated?

There are currently many treatment modalities for a stroke, whether on the right side of the brain or the left side. According to the signs and symptoms, both invasive and non-invasive treatment options and management plans for stroke, should be provided by the health care provider after a complete physical examination and taking into account the medical and drug history of the individual.

Mentioned below are the available treatment options that are best decided by the health care provider keeping in mind the underlying cause of the stroke.

  • Embolectomy.

  • Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator or TPA injection.

  • Alteplase or Activase injection.

  • Tenecteplase or TNKase injection.

  • Vertebrobasilar angioplasty.

  • Physical therapy- to improve movement.

  • Occupational therapy- to help with daily tasks and self-care.

  • Carotid Endarterectomy.

  • Speech therapy- to improve swallowing and speech.

  • Psychological therapy- to provide support after the stroke.

Conclusion

A stroke may possess various effects, depending on which side of the brain is affected. For example, a right-sided stroke can cause left-sided weakness, sensory loss, loss of vision, and personality changes. The risk of suffering from a stroke may be reduced drastically if most of the risk factors get identified on time and are managed promptly. Usually, a stroke, whenever treated, can leave residual effects. Therefore, stroke rehabilitation is a critical factor in stroke recovery. Following a well-balanced diet with increased physical activity are vital in keeping strokes at bay.

Frequently Asked Questions

1.

What Are the Symptoms of a Right-Sided Stroke?

 - Sudden weakness of the face.
 - Liability of the arm or leg.
 - Severe dizziness.
 - Balance problems.
 - Difficulty walking.
 - Confusion.
 - Head pain.
 - Muscle loss on the left side of the body.
 - The vision is blurred.
 - Seeing issues from the left side of each eye.
 - Hearing problems.
 - Sensory changes on the left side of the body.
 - Problems with depth perception.
 - Not understanding directions.
 - Memory problems.
 - Difficulty in problem-solving.
 - Not able to make decisions.
 - Problems in breathing.
 - Problems chewing and swallowing.
 - Slurred way of speaking.
 - Drooping on the left side of the face.
 - Paralysis in the left side of the body.
 - Loss of consciousness.
 - Blinding pain.
 - Vertigo.
 - Generalized numbness.
 - Stiffness of muscles.
 - Rapid involuntary eye movement.
 - Reduced sensation of touch.
 - Pins and needles.
 - Overactive reflexes.
 - Fatigue.
 - Temporary loss of vision.

2.

What Is the Difference Between Left-Sided Stroke and Right-Sided Stroke?

A stroke is a condition of the brain when it does not receive blood supply and thus stops working. A stroke can affect the entire brain or a part of the brain. When it occurs on the right side, it is called a right-sided stroke, and when it occurs on the left side, it is called a left-sided stroke.

3.

Is a Right-Side Stroke Worse Than a Left-Side Stroke?

At times, yes, because a right-sided brain stroke occurs when the right side of the brain is completely devoid of blood and, thus, oxygen supply. The right brain helps in the normal functioning of the left body, whereas the left brain aids in the regular working of the right body. In addition, the right side of the brain is responsible for some amount of thought processing, the judgment of distance and space, and the body's positioning.

4.

What Is a Stroke?

A stroke is a condition of the brain when it does not receive blood supply and thus stops working. A stroke can affect the entire brain or a part of the brain. Additionally, strokes can affect the right side and the whole left side of the brain. There are many symptoms of a stroke. Right-sided stroke shows signs on the entire left side of the body and vice versa. The brain cells can immediately die due to a lack of oxygen supply. A stroke is a medical emergency.

5.

Can a Right-Sided Stroke Be Treated?

There are currently many treatment modalities for a stroke, whether on the right side of the brain or the left side. According to the signs and symptoms, both invasive and non-invasive treatment options and management plans for stroke should be provided by the health care provider after a complete physical examination and taking into account the medical and drug history of the individual.

6.

Does a Right-Sided Stroke Impact Speech?

A stroke may possess various effects, depending on which side of the brain is affected. For example, a right-sided stroke can cause left-sided weakness, sensory loss, loss of vision, and personality changes. When a patient’s speech is affected, speech therapy is provided in order to improve swallowing and speech.

7.

Do Right-Sided Stroke Patients Communicate Efficiently?

The risk of suffering from a stroke may be reduced drastically if most of the risk factors get identified on time and are managed promptly. Usually, a stroke, whenever treated, can leave residual effects. One of the most common aftermaths of stroke is a decreased ability to understand and communicate effectively.

8.

What Not Do After a Right-Sided Stroke?

 - Drinking alcohol.
 - Eating excessive amounts of salt.
 - Indulging in sugar-rich foods.
 - Eating food with high cholesterol.

9.

Do Right-Sided Stroke Patients Sleep for Long Hours?

The right brain helps in the normal functioning of the left body, whereas the left brain aids in the regular working of the right body. A right-sided brain stroke occurs when the right side of the brain is completely devoid of blood and, thus, oxygen supply. There are many symptoms of a stroke. One of them is excessive sleeping, also known as EDS or excessive daytime sleepiness.
Source Article IclonSourcesSource Article Arrow
Dr. Isaac Gana
Dr. Isaac Gana

Cardiology

Tags:

stroke
Community Banner Mobile
By subscribing, I agree to iCliniq's Terms & Privacy Policy.

Source Article ArrowMost popular articles

Ask your health query to a doctor online

Cardiology

*guaranteed answer within 4 hours

Disclaimer: No content published on this website is intended to be a substitute for professional medical diagnosis, advice or treatment by a trained physician. Seek advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with questions you may have regarding your symptoms and medical condition for a complete medical diagnosis. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this website. Read our Editorial Process to know how we create content for health articles and queries.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. iCliniq privacy policy