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Coping with Leucoderma (Vitiligo): the White Spot Disease

Published on Feb 08, 2016 and last reviewed on Mar 30, 2021   -  4 min read

Abstract

Leucoderma is a common skin condition, and it has a considerable social stigma. It is better to be informed about the disease and know how you can help yourself or another individual adjust to one's family, society and become a productive member of the community.

Coping with Leucoderma (Vitiligo): the White Spot Disease

What Is Leucoderma (Vitiligo)?

Vitiligo (also called white spot disease) is a skin disorder characterized by total skin color loss in the affected area.

What Are The Causes Of Vitiligo?

The exact cause is not known, but it is usually known to be hereditary.

Some of the most frequent causes of Leucoderma might involve traumatic incidents, including accidental cuts, thermal burns, Psoriasis, Eczema, and ulcers following the development of the white patches. Leucoderma can also be caused due to Congenital abnormalities, like partial albinism, Tuberous sclerosis, Waardenburg syndrome, and Piebaldism. This issue can also result from some immunological conditions like Vitiligo, Melanoma-associated leucoderma, Halo mole, or vitiligo. Certain medications like EGFR inhibitors, Intralesional steroid injections, and others could likewise cause Leucoderma. Certain chemicals like butyl-phenol can also trigger the symptoms and may cause Leucoderma.

What Are The Symptoms of Vitiligo?

Leucoderma is more common in females than in males. We can usually see it on the hands, neck, back, and wrist. Though this condition does not cause any systemic impairment, the patches indeed will look ugly and upsetting. Vitiligo can attack people of any age and sex and can be seen on any skin. The symptoms may include:

What are the Risk Factors for Leucoderma?

You should be more careful if you have one or more of the following:

Doubtful or fresh lesions can be confirmed using special light (UV Light or Woods' lamp). Leucoderma patches get accentuated under such lighting.

How To Diagnose Leucoderma?

If the doctor suspects Leucoderma's symptoms, the doctor might investigate your medical history and conduct a thorough examination of other related skin disorders, including dermatitis and psoriasis. The physician might also use a unique lamp for shining the ultraviolet light into the skin to decide whether you have Leucoderma or not. Under ultraviolet light, the leucoderma skin may appear as milky white. The doctor might again ask for a skin biopsy and blood test towards diagnosing Leucoderma. Once the symptoms and causes of Leucoderma have been determined, the doctor might recommend the required treatments or remedies.

What Is The Treatment For Leucoderma?

The Leucoderma treatment's main objective includes the correction of the body's metabolism and improving the overall immune system. This will enhance the ability of pigmentation in the involved area. Most of the treatments for Leucoderma might help in rejuvenating the skin color. The effects of the treatment might differ from one person to another. Some of the standard therapies for Leucoderma include:

  1. Skin grafting where a small part of the normally pigmented skin is eliminated and engrafted in the discolored areas).

  2. Blister grafting where small blisters are formed in the normal pigmented area fixed on the affected area).

  3. Micro-pigmentation where pigments are implanted into the skin through a particular surgical instrument in tattooing).

What Are The Home Remedies for Leucoderma?

What Are The Factors That Increase the Risk of Treatment Difficulties?

What Are The Complications of Vitiligo?

Complications of vitiligo may include:

What Foods to Be Avoided in Leucoderma?

Patients with Leucoderma should avoid highly antigenic foods like:

What Are The Points To Be Remembered in Leucoderma?

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Frequently Asked Questions


1.

What Are the Causes of Leucoderma?

Leucoderma occurs due to several causes, they are:
1) Congenital abnormalities.
2) Autoimmune disorders.
3) Trauma.
4) Psoriasis.
5) Eczema.
6) Immunologic diseases.
- Vitiligo.
- Halo mole.
- Melanoma-associated leukoderma or vitiligo.
7) When exposed to butyl-phenol.
8) Intralesional steroid injections.
9) EGFR inhibitors.

2.

Can Leucoderma Be Cured?

As of now, there is no cure for leucoderma, and it can be controlled with treatment options such as depigmentation of the skin and exposure to UVA and UVB light in severe cases. They sometimes go away on their own, and when it does not happen, doctors prescribe treatments to even out the skin tone.

3.

Is Leucoderma and Vitiligo the Same?

Vitiligo is also known as leucoderma, where white patches develop on the skin as a result of decreased melanocytes within the skin. It is an autoimmune disorder where the body's immune system attacks the normal healthy cells, affecting the body.

4.

Is Leucoderma Hereditary?

Leucoderma is not strictly associated with families, but at times it runs in families. It is said that more than 30% of people with this condition have a family history of leucoderma, suggesting that genetics play a major role.

5.

What Is the Best Treatment for Leucoderma?

It is shown that corticosteroids are effective on small newly depigmented areas. It can also be used on the face; however, 57% of adult patients and 64% of childhood patients have shown effective results.

6.

How Can Leucoderma Be Prevented?

There are very few ways to prevent leucoderma, where-
- Limiting sun exposure is the most effective way.
- Applying turmeric and mustard oil paste.
- Drinking lots of water with a copper cup as copper helps to prevent this condition.
- Taking a healthy amount of iron-rich foods cooked in a cast-iron skillet is also helpful.
- Zinc also helps us prevent leucoderma.
- Applying extracts of margosa leaves and honey.
- Practicing yoga.

7.

Why Is Leucoderma Caused?

Leucoderma is caused due to loss of pigment-forming cells known as melanocytes resulting in white patches all over the skin. This is most commonly seen in dark-skinned individuals and found in all races equally.

8.

Is Leucoderma Harmful to Humans?

The white spot disease "leucoderma" is harmful as it can result with-
- Sunburns.
- Loss of hearing.
- Vision changes.

9.

What Is the Difference Between White Patches and Vitiligo?

Both can appear as a segmental or a focal patch and can be differentiated by the area of the spread. The white patches appear as a smaller segmental or focal patch in one or a few areas, where vitiligo appears in focal or segmental patches seen at a particular area on one side of the body.

10.

Does Leucoderma Start Suddenly?

It starts suddenly with the development of white patches on the skin, mostly on the sun-exposed areas. Also, eyelashes, hair, and beard turn grey, along with loss of color in the retina of the eyes and mucosal membranes.

Article Resources

Last reviewed at:
30 Mar 2021  -  4 min read

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