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HomeAnswersNeurologycortical atrophyKindly interpret the results of my MRI that was taken twice.

My report says 'focal cortical atrophy.' Is my brain in a healthy state?

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The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

Medically reviewed by

Dr. Sowmiya D

Published At February 5, 2018
Reviewed AtFebruary 8, 2024

Patient's Query

Hi doctor,

I have a neurology-related question. I have anxiety disorder and depression. I have had two brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) in the last two months and wanted to discuss those. My first brain MRI said 'non-specific increased T2 and flair'. The above finding did not come in the second MRI, but it said 'mild age-inappropriate focal cortical atrophy. In both cases, the doctor said it was nothing to worry about. But, I want to take another opinion as well.

Answered by Dr. Aida Abaz Quka

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com. These brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (attachment removed to protect patient identity) do not indicate any severe medical disorder. The change in these two MRI results may be related to the MRI machine resolution (maybe you have performed MRI in different clinics) or may be explained by the radiologist qualification. Do you suffer from throbbing headaches? If yes, migraine is a probable cause. Chronic sinusitis seems to be the main finding in these MRIs. For this reason, a nasal drop decongestant may be needed.

Patient's Query

Hi doctor,

Thanks for your reply. I appreciate the quick response. Treatment for sinus has started. Yes, it was conducted in two different clinics in two other countries. But, from the brain point of view - anything to do, anything to worry about? Is my brain in a healthy state?

Answered by Dr. Aida Abaz Quka

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com. Small nonspecific T2 lesions could be related to migraines and headaches. I would recommend following up with a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after two years. The cortical atrophy is uncommon for your age, but it is not a concerning finding, as it does not indicate anything serious. Do you have memory problems? There is nothing to worry about if you do not have such issues. If you have migraine headaches, it would be necessary to treat them with preventive therapy. Daily Aspirin may be needed after the age of 50. I would also recommend monitoring your blood lipid profile, fasting glucose, and blood pressure. It is necessary to take a balanced diet and avoid smoking contacts or alcohol abuse.

Patient's Query

Hi doctor,

Thanks for your reply. I do not have migraine.

Answered by Dr. Aida Abaz Quka

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com. In such a case, there is nothing to worry about. I would recommend following a healthy lifestyle (Mediterranean diet, avoiding smoking contacts or alcohol abuse) and performing many physical activities (aerobics, walking, yoga, sports, etc.). It is necessary to check your thyroid hormone levels. Periodically follow up with a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) every three to five years is required to monitor these brain MRI findings for any possible progression. If you have any other questions, please do not hesitate to ask me again.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Aida Abaz Quka
Dr. Aida Abaz Quka

Neurology

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