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HomeAnswersObstetrics and GynecologypcosCan PCOS cause light bleeding between periods?

Can transvaginal abdominal and pelvis scans be done during periods?

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Medically reviewed by

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Published At April 5, 2024
Reviewed AtApril 10, 2024

Patient's Query

Hi doctor,

I am a 23-year-old female suffering from PCOS. I missed my last period and the month's end. I started getting light spotting, both brown and red in color, like a very light period. That has lasted for a few days until today. I also had protected sexual intercourse at this time but wondered if I should take a Levonorgestrel pill in case the condom had failed. I was on the hormone pill for three months intervals earlier. I had transvaginal, abdominal and pelvis scans. Would this be advisable, considering I am bleeding now? Kindly provide your suggestions.

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

I understand your concern.

Based on the information you have provided, I can offer some general guidance. If you have PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), it is possible that your menstrual cycle may be irregular, and you may experience light spotting or bleeding between periods. This is known as intermenstrual bleeding (IMB) and is relatively common in women with PCOS. If you have had protected sexual intercourse during this time and are concerned about the possibility of pregnancy, it is essential to speak with a healthcare provider for personalized guidance based on your individual circumstances and symptoms. They can help determine the likelihood of pregnancy based on the timing of your sexual activity and the reliability of your birth control method. If you have already started bleeding, it is less likely that you are pregnant, as implantation bleeding (bleeding that occurs shortly after conception) is typically lighter and shorter in duration than a regular period. However, it is still essential to use reliable birth control consistently and correctly to prevent unintended pregnancy.

If you have concerns about the effectiveness of your birth control method or would like to discuss additional contraceptive options, it is essential to speak with a healthcare provider for personalized guidance based on your individual circumstances and symptoms. They can help determine the best course of action for managing your PCOS symptoms and preventing unintended pregnancies. In terms of taking emergency contraception, this may be advisable if you have had unprotected sexual intercourse or if you suspect that your birth control method has failed. However, it is essential to take the emergency contraceptive pill as soon as possible after sexual activity, ideally within 72 hours, for maximum effectiveness. If you have already started bleeding or are experiencing menstrual-like symptoms, it may be less effective at preventing pregnancy, as it works by delaying ovulation rather than preventing fertilization. It is essential to speak with a healthcare provider for personalized guidance based on your individual circumstances and symptoms to determine whether emergency contraception is appropriate in your case.

I hope you find this helpful.

Revert in case of doubt.

Take care.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Vandana Andrews
Dr. Vandana Andrews

General Practitioner

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