iCliniq logo

Ask a Doctor Online Now

HomeAnswersPediatricsneonatal jaundiceWhat to do for jaundice in a newborn? Is it dangerous?

Is jaundice in a newborn dangerous? What has to be done?

Share

The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

Medically reviewed by

iCliniq medical review team

Published At June 22, 2018
Reviewed AtFebruary 26, 2024

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

My cousin gave birth to a baby boy yesterday at 38 weeks and baby is 6.17 lbs in weight. Yesterday evening the doctor told us that the baby has jaundice at 3.3 and now it is 5.3 What should we do for this? Is it dangerous? Hospital people said yesterday it was mild and does not need treatment, still, it increased?

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

Jaundice developing in a baby after 24 hours of life is physiological jaundice and does not require any treatment unless it crosses a limit assigned. Various factors are taken into account like:

  1. S bilirubin.
  2. Baby blood group.
  3. Mother's blood group.
  4. Gestational age of the baby.
  5. Day of life.
  6. Any other risk factor.

At present, I can assure you that no treatment is required. In your case treatment will generally be required once her bilirubin crosses 15.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

Baby and mother blood groups are same as both are B negative. Gestational age is 37 to 38 weeks. It is c-section delivery. The baby had jaundice at 1.9 in blood and 3.3 by machine on the first day of birth that is yesterday and today by machine it is increased to 5.3. Still, no treatment needed? Is it treatable?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

In your case physiological jaundice, with no blood group incompatibility. Term baby with no complication and adequate weight. Treatment will only be required when S-bilirubin crosses 17. No need to worry, this is normal physiology. Just keep a watch and be in regular follow up with your doctor.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

Today jaundice by machine test is 7. They are going do a blood test also. How can it be controlled as it is increasing?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

Now, let me tell you the normal physiology. A baby when intrauterine (in mother's womb) has hemoglobin F. This has very less role after birth, so this is disintegrated and new hemoglobin regenerates in the body of the baby known as hemoglobin A, this is the adult hemoglobin which is present in our body. Now, the disintegrated hemoglobin F is digested by the liver and byproduct bilirubin is excreted out through stool and urine. As the liver of the baby is immature, some amount of bilirubin spreads back to the blood and body. This happens with almost all baby after birth.

Normally the S bilirubin may rise up to 11 to 12. Then decrease back to normal of below 2. This whole process may take 7 to 10 days. You should feed the child adequately so that he passes more urine and stool to excrete out the bilirubin.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

I just got blood report and I am attaching it. Direct bilirubin is 0, indirect is 7.8, total 7.8. This is 51 hours after birth.

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

The report is absolutely normal for age. No intervention required. Keep baby hydrated by feeding adequately.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

Today, that is 72 hours after birth, the level is 10. Again increased from 7.8 to 10.2. Is it still normal? When can we expect it to go down?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

S bilirubin may have rising trend for first 5 to 7 days. It will decrease thereafter. S bilirubin of 10 is not a problem at this age. As I have already told you. Continue to feed the baby adequately. No intervention is required right now.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

We got the mother and baby home. They say 15 bilirubin is cut off for treatment. Now is it possible that tomorrow or day after tomorrow, jaundice can increase and when to seek treatment?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

It is good that you are home now. Take care of the baby. Get a fresh S bilirubin done on the day after tomorrow. So that we have exact pattern of jaundice. Keep the baby hydrated, feed adequately.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

Tomorrow we will take the baby for jaundice test to hospital. Secondly, I just checked the baby temperature in the underarm and it is 98.7 degrees Fahrenheit. Is it normal? Do we have to increase temperature to one degree more?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

The temperature of the baby seems to be normal. The temperature of 98.3 to 99.7 degrees Fahrenheit is taken to be normal. Do let me know the test report.

Patient's Query

Thank you doctor,

I mean temperature in the armpit or oral? His 98.7 degrees Fahrenheit temperature is in the armpit. Is armpit temperature one degree less than actual temperature? Does it have any relation with bilirubin?

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

No, temperature as such does not have any relation to rising in S bilirubin level. For all standard medical purposes, the axillary temperature that is armpit temperature is taken as standard. I am emphasizing the same. No need to worry, the temperature of the baby is fine.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Amit Kumar Modi
Dr. Amit Kumar Modi

Pediatrics

Community Banner Mobile
By subscribing, I agree to iCliniq's Terms & Privacy Policy.

Read answers about:

baby feverneonatal jaundice

Ask your health query to a doctor online

Pediatrics

*guaranteed answer within 4 hours

Disclaimer: No content published on this website is intended to be a substitute for professional medical diagnosis, advice or treatment by a trained physician. Seek advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with questions you may have regarding your symptoms and medical condition for a complete medical diagnosis. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this website. Read our Editorial Process to know how we create content for health articles and queries.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. iCliniq privacy policy