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Q. Is it normal to have dilated vessels on the outer surface of the uterus?

Answered by
Dr. Sameer Kumar
and medically reviewed by Dr. Preetha J
This is a premium question & answer published on Nov 27, 2021

Hi doctor,

I just had a 4.8 cm complex ovarian cyst removed, and they found several black dots on my ovary. I had severe pain for a week. After surgery, the pain is slightly better, but I still have lower pelvic pain and lower back pain. They took the biopsy (a black dot on my ovary), thinking it might be endometriosis. The pathology report came back saying no to endometriosis, and that was benign fibroconnective tissue on the ovary. What does that mean? I am currently taking antidepressants. I also had some dilated vessels on the outer surface of the left side of the uterus. Is that normal?

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#

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

You have not attached the histopathology report; however, the surgery details depict that the cysts were complex hemorrhagic cysts which are endometriotic cysts-with chocolate anchovy sauce-like material filled in them. This was a case of an endometriotic cyst that was operated on, and ate black spots cannot be anything else but endometriotic spots. However, there is a possibility that the site biopsied for black spots had more fibrous connective tissue (peritoneum, part of broad ligament, and collagen structures), which got reported.

Anyhow, the tissue was benign, and hence no apparent need to be worried, but yes, endometriosis is recurrent, and you should seek treatment for the same.

Regards.

Hi doctor,

Thank you for your reply. It makes sense. What about the dilated blood vessels on the left side of my uterus? Is that anything to be concerned about?

#

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

The hyperemia or increased blood supply to the left side of the uterus can be explained by the presence of endometriosis on the left side than the right. Keeping in the view that the complex ovarian hemorrhagic endometriotic ovarian cyst was on the left side, which needed more blood supply to thrive. So that explains the hyperemia on the left side. With fulguration of endometriotic spots and removal of left ovarian endometritis cyst, the hyperemia shall reduce on its own in the next 15-20 days. Regards.


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