Q. My grandmother has multiple gallstones. Is there any nonsurgical method to treat it?

Answered by
Dr. Ahmad Meleha
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Oct 16, 2019

Hello doctor,

My grandmother has multiple gallstones. She is very weak, and according to our doctor, she will not be able to tolerate surgery. I wanted to know if there are any non-surgical methods to treat this condition. She is having severe abdominal pain, accompanied with pain between the shoulders.

She is having this problem for more than 8-12 months now. In addition to the problems that I have mentioned, she says that she can not eat anything. Even though she feels hungry, she says that her stomach feels full. Also, she says that she experiences a severe burning sensation whenever she eats or drinks anything.

She is not taking any medications for this specific issue. She takes medicines for soothing the burning sensation down her throat to the chest so that she can eat peacefully. Apart from that, she takes medicine for keeping her blood pressure in control. Though she does not have any heart disease, she does take some medicine for heart as a precaution.

We did an ultrasound, and the reports are attached. As per the report, she has multiple gall stones, along with the possibility of the adhesion of the gallbladder with the bowel. There is no surety about this; it is just a possibility.

#

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

I have seen the reports. (attachments removed to protect patient identity).

There is no doubt that laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a safe and the standard treatment for cholecystitis nowadays.

However, some patients continue antibiotic therapy without undergoing surgery.

She could be admitted and receive medications, including antibiotic therapy, according to the protocols, analgesia with paracetamol and Metamizole, prophylaxis of thromboembolic disease, and proton pump inhibitor administration.

Oral intake of water should be initiated upon admission if she did not complain of nausea or vomiting, with a progressive increase of liquid and food intake according to her oral tolerance. In my opinion, you should revise her surgeon about the availability of performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

I hope this helps.


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