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Q. My WBC count increased after an exposure. Is it an indication of HIV?

Answered by
Dr. Sushil Kakkar
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Oct 13, 2017

Hello doctor,

I am a 28 year old male. I had an exposure with an unknown girl 43 days ago and the condom tore when my penis was still inside her vagina. The next morning, I saw a red mark on the tip of my penis. It disappeared in three days. I do not know the HIV status of the girl. I had done HIV 1 and 2 antibody and p24 antigen test 31 days after the of exposure and the results were non-reactive. I have a low viral fever from the last five days and my WBC count was 12,500. What are the chances of being infected? Is this test conclusive after 31 days? Also, I have a stuffy nose since 20 days and a pain in my legs and foot from the past five days. There is no rash, headache or sore throat. Are these the symptoms of early HIV infection?

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#

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

I have noted your concern.

  • At one month, this test is 95 % sensitive. So, it is fairly accurate at this stage. However, since a condom break amounts to unprotected sex (high-risk exposure), ideally you should follow it up by a retest at 12 weeks for an HIV antibody which is 99.9 % sensitive. That would be conclusive.

Regards.

For more information consult a dermatologist online --> https://icliniq.com./ask-a-doctor-online/dermatologist

Hello doctor,

Thank you for your reply. But, the symptoms that I mentioned, are they early signs of an HIV infection? And most importantly, why is there an increase in the WBC count? In HIV, do the WBC cells increase or decrease?

#

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

  • Flu-like symptoms are not specific to an HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection. They can happen otherwise as well in healthy individuals with intact immunity.
  • Typically, in most viral infections and in acute retroviral syndrome (ARS) of early HIV infection the WBC count declines, and in particular, it is associated with a decline in CD4+ T cell count.

Regards.

For more information consult a dermatologist online --> https://icliniq.com./ask-a-doctor-online/dermatologist


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