Q. Can rubella of 3 IU/mL affect my pregnancy?

Answered by
Dr. R Balakrishnan Menon
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
Published on May 15, 2018

Hello doctor,

My rubella is 3 IU/mL non-reactive and I am six-weeks pregnant. Do I have rubella infection? Are there any chances of any birth defects?

Dr. R Balakrishnan Menon

Infertility Obstetrics And Gynaecology
#

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

Rubella is a serious infection to affect pregnancy.

Your blood report only states that you had a rubella infection only some time in life. It does not seem to be an active infection. You get it only once.

So all you need to know is that that was an infection that happened long back and will not be present in the body now to affect the baby.

So you do not stand a chance of rubella-induced malformations.

For your information, rubella is like a common cold. You could have had it any day before pregnancy.

For more information consult an obstetrician and gynaecologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/obstetrician-and-gynaecologist

Also Read Answers From:

Related Questions & Answers


Is it safe to travel with placenta previa?

Query: Hi doctor, Last week, on my second scan (20 week pregnancy), I was diagnosed with the low-lying placenta. I did not have any bleeding or pain so far. I am going for my holiday in five days, and I am wondering if I can fly. Is it safe?  Read Full »

Ectopic Pregnancy

Article Overview: In an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg gets attached anywhere outside the uterus. Ectopic pregnancies are very common and occur in about 1 in every 50 pregnancies. It is a medical emergency and if left untreated, can also be fatal. Read Article


Dr. Sneha Kannan
Obstetrician And Gynaecologist

What is an Ectopic Pregnancy? Fertilization of the ovum by sperm takes place in the fallopian tubes. After fertilization, the fertilized egg travels through the fallopian tube to the uterus. Normally, this embryo gets attached to the wall of the uterus and develops. In an ectopic pregnancy, the fer...  Read Article

Intermenstrual Bleeding or Spotting - Is it Normal or Should I be Worried?

Article Overview: Intermenstrual vaginal bleeding or spotting or bleeding between periods is considered abnormal and may usually require a patient seeing a doctor. It is also termed metrorrhagia. Normally, a woman has a regular menstrual cycle of 28 days with ranges between 21-35 days considered normal and menses can last for 2-7 days. Any bleeding out of these are considered abnormal.  Read Article


Dr. Nsah Bernard
Obstetrician And Gynaecologist

Causes of Intermenstrual bleeding: Intermenstrual bleeding or bleeding between periods can be caused by a vast number of factors which may be physical or organic and psychosocial. If you are experiencing intermenstrual bleeding, then your doctor maybe a able to rule out one of the below most probab...  Read Article

Popular

Popular

Ask your health query to a doctor online?

Ask an Obstetrician & Gynaecologist Now

* guaranteed answer within 4 hours.
Enter Your Health Query
You can upload files and images in the next step.

Fee:  

 


Disclaimer: All health Q&As published on this website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical diagnosis, advice or treatment by a trained physician. Seek the advice from your physician or other qualified health-care providers with questions you may have regarding your symptoms and medical condition for a complete medical diagnosis. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this website.