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HomeAnswersCardiologyleft ventricular hypertrophyMy son's ECG shows left ventricular hypertrophy. What to do?

Why does RBBB and left ventricular hypertrophy mean on ECG?

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The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

Medically reviewed by

Dr. K. Shobana

Published At March 27, 2018
Reviewed AtApril 26, 2024

Patient's Query

Hi doctor,

My son is 12 years old, very active, plays representative basketball and attends a sports high school. Last Sunday, he was knocked over while playing and hurt his arm. After getting up, he fainted. He was fine after that. There were no broken bones, but the medical center did an ECG, and it says on the ECG as non-confirmed diagnosis, incomplete RBBB marked left ventricular hypertrophy. We took this to a pediatrician and he said his ECG can be normal but said maybe seeing a cardiologist would make us feel better. I have booked in to see one but I would like some reassurance because the appointment is one month away. The pediatricians report says incidental finding of a partial RBBB and slight tall R waves in V4-V6. I have a copy of the ECG if needed.

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

The ECG (electrocardiogram) is showing incomplete RBBB (right bundle branch block) or early RBBB and features of left ventricular hypertrophy, and also heart rate is on lower side nearing 60 beats per minute. But as you mentioned, he is a basketball player. So, athletic person or one doing exercises get these changes. This is called as athletic heart. So, the first possibility is of athletic heart. Due to chronic exercises, there is thickening of heart wall similar to our biceps on workouts. This is seen as hypertrophy on. ECG and may cause RBBB and minor conduction abnormalities. So overall, it does not look worrisome, but we need to rule out hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as he also has fainting. So he will need echocardiography to confirm the findings. Fainting may otherwise occur due to pain or inadequate food intake as well. I guess there is no family history of sudden unexplained cardiac deaths. So, get his echocardiography done and try to restrict his sporty activities till echocardiography. Have plenty of water and oral fluids to avoid fainting and syncope.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Sagar Ramesh Makode
Dr. Sagar Ramesh Makode

Cardiology

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