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HomeAnswersRadiologymagnetic resonance imagingKindly explain the MRI taken for left knee soreness.

Kindly explain MRI taken for soreness of anterior knee.

The following is an actual conversation between an iCliniq user and a doctor that has been reviewed and published as a Premium Q&A.

Answered by

Dr. Vivek Chail

Medically reviewed by

Dr. K. Shobana

Published At May 22, 2018
Reviewed AtJanuary 19, 2024

Patient's Query

Hello doctor,

I am a 28-year-old male, weight around 78 kg and have been having soreness on my left anterior knee for the last three to four months (not an accident or anything just started getting sore). I finally got an MRI and was told the following (but I do not really understand the terminology).

Findings are the ACL and PCL are intact. The medial and lateral menisci are intact. There is no major chondral wear in the femorotibial compartment. The extensor mechanism of the knee is intact. There is edema in the superolateral Hoffa's fat pad indicating patellar maltracking and fat pad impingement. There is no major patellofemoral chondral wear. There is a small joint effusion. The conclusion was no meniscal tear, features of patellar maltracking. Small joint effusion. Can someone please tell me if this means anything serious? My physiotherapist told me nothing to worry about but I do not understand what was said in the findings?

Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail

Hi,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

Let me explain the report findings (attachments removed to protect the patient's identity) in simple words.

  1. The ACL and PCL are intact. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments are important to provide stability to the knee and are frequently injured due to trauma. Your ACL and PCL are normal.
  2. The medial and lateral menisci are intact. Menisci are small round disc like structures which give cushioning to the knee joint. There are two menisci medial and lateral. Your medial and lateral menisci are normal.
  3. There are no major chondral wear in the femorotibial compartment. This means the cartilages are normal and do not show any significant degenerative changes.
  4. The extensor mechanism of the knee is intact. There is oedema in the superolateral Hoffa's fat pad indicating patellar maltracking and fat pad impingement. There is no major patellofermoral chondral wear. This shows the knee cap (patella) is slighty out of place during muscle action and is causing mild friction and local inflammation swelling in the fat area above and beside the knee cap (patella). This can cause your pain.
  5. There is a small joint effusion. There is a small amount of fluid collection in the knee joint. It is not a serious problem.

Same symptoms don't mean you have the same problem. Consult a doctor now!

Dr. Vivek Chail
Dr. Vivek Chail

General Practitioner

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