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Q. Will my kidney stone escalate my issues of high BP and diabetes?

Answered by
Dr. Sandeep Varma
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Oct 26, 2017

Hello doctor,

I am a 48-year-old male. I have a high blood pressure since five years and type 2 diabetes mellitus since two years. I had a master health checkup last week. My reports showed serum albumin at 3.2, total protein at 5.8, and globulin at 2.6. The urine analysis report and the X-ray and ECG, etc., were all normal. I am worried about these lower than normal values. I am enclosing the reports. Kindly advise.

#

Hello,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

  • From your reports (attachment removed to protect patient identity), it is clear that apart from serum protein and albumin, all other parameters look normal. However, even these values are not grossly abnormal.
  • As you may be knowing, the liver is the site of production of albumin and protein. Hence, it would be worthwhile to do an ultrasound of the abdomen to check for liver problems.
  • Liver enzymes are not always very sensitive to the changes in the liver. The kidneys look normal. However, I suggest you should not be too much stressed with a mild alteration in these values.
  • I would suggest you get your albumin and serum protein levels checked again after two weeks.

For more information consult a nephrologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/nephrologist

Thank you doctor.

I got a great relief from your answer. The ultrasound scanning report is also available with me, and I have attatched here. I request you to have a look into it. The report says there is a 4 mm stone in the left kidney. What should I do?

#

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

  • It is good to hear that your stress is relieved to some extent.
  • The ultrasound of the abdomen shows a normal liver (attachment removed to protect patient identity).
  • Yes, there is a stone in one of the kidneys; however, it likely may not cause any harm. Most of the kidney stones of less than 6 mm pass out by themselves.
  • A single small stone inside the kidney does not produce any ill effect. Detailed renal workup is warranted only if there are recurrent bilateral kidney stones with renal failure or with a family history of stones.
  • However, it is good to have at least 2.5 liters of water a day and reduce the intake of salt in your food. I also suggest you avoid non-vegetarian foods for some time.

For more information consult a nephrologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/nephrologist


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