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Q. Kindly interpret my cardiac MRI that I had for chest pain.

Answered by
Dr. Anshul Varshney
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Dec 13, 2018

Hello doctor,

I had a cardiac MRI done and wanted to see if you can interpret it for me. I am worried.

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#

Hi,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

We are here to help you. I evaluated your report (attachment removed to protect patient identity), and it looks normal to me. Your report does not signify the presence of any ischemic heart diseases to you. It means your cardiac functions are good as per the report.

Now, to help you further better this report needs to be correlated clinically. So, I need to know your symptoms for which this MRI was performed. Also, mention if you have any pre-existing disease.

Hi doctor,

Well, the reason I had this MRI done is that I was experiencing some chest pain. My doctor suspected anxiety and sent me to a nuclear stress test in which the ejection fraction was 46%. So, he said that it was low and ordered this MRI. I just wanted to know if the cardiac dimensions shown in this MRI are normal. What are possible tricuspid insufficiency and thickening of the anteroseptal wall?

#

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

If we co-relate your symptoms with your MRI report, your symptoms are not because of a cardiac issue as there is no evidence of a cardiac problem or heart attack in your MRI report. In such a situation, I advise a treadmill test (TMT) or a stress ECHO to rule out any evidence of angina or stress on the heart.

Let me describe you the abnormal findings described in your MRI:

1. Mild intensity delayed enhancement pattern. This is a finding which could happen in a healthy person too and does not signify any evidence of any cardiac issues. However, they are suspecting sarcoidosis that would be clear by a CT chest and serum ACE levels (angiotensin converting enzyme). This is significant if you have a cough or fever.

2. Your ejection fraction is 64% means your heart is working well.

3. Thickening of the anteroseptal wall is significant only if you have any high blood pressure or pre-existing cardiac issues. Since you do not have any, this is not significant.

4. Mild tricuspid insufficiency is also considered normal.

So, overall my opinion is that if you have any breathing issues or cough, then you need further evaluation of these findings. Otherwise, these findings would be considered as normal and there are no cardiac issues in your report. I hope it helps you.


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