Q. The skin in my groin is irritated after protected sex with a sex worker. What should I do?

Answered by
Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Mar 16, 2021 and last reviewed on: Apr 17, 2021

Hi doctor,

I had a high-risk encounter on Friday night with a sex worker. We used a condom, and she wiped our contact areas with an antibacterial wipe, a separate one for her and me, and we had sex. I came in the condom, and she used a fresh wipe to remove the condom. On Saturday morning, I noticed that I have an abrasion along my groin's inner part, next to my scrotum. I am concerned that the vaginal fluids may have leaked down my scrotum and possibly contacted this area. The skin looks irritated, and I cannot be sure if the skin was fully intact at the time of the encounter. What should I do?

#

Hi,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

Thank you for the query. It appears to be due to friction or irritation. Clean the area with warm water twice daily. You can apply a topical antibiotic cream. The chances of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) are very low. As a baseline, you can go for STD (sexually transmitted disease) panel test now and after three months of exposure as a routine.

Thank you doctor,

I went to the local emergency room earlier today. The nurse examined me and noticed the following on the base of my penis, which I did not notice before my visit. I had a syphilis test done a couple of weeks back, one week after my last exposure, preceding this recent sex encounter on Saturday morning. The syphilis test was negative. However, it seems that it is too soon to test to be sure this is not a syphilitic chancre? The emergency room doctor did not treat me for syphilis and said my HIV exposure was low risk and did not warrant PEP. However, if this chancre is syphilis, what should I do?

#

Hello,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

The lesion appears to be due to injury or friction and not chancre. So do not worry about it. If your doctor did not feel the need for PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis), then the risk, as I said earlier, is too low. Just relax.

Thank you doctor,

I appreciate your reassurance. I plan to get tested in two weeks via PCR and again in sixty days.

#

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

You can go for a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test after two weeks and an HIV antibodies test after three months of exposure.


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