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Q. I have frequent urination and minimal calcification. Does it mean prostate cancer?

Answered by
Dr. Karthik Rajan
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.
This is a premium question & answer published on Aug 20, 2018 and last reviewed on: Jun 26, 2019

Hi doctor,

I am 27 years old. I am worried about my prostate as my grandfather had prostate cancer and my father had an enlargement but was already cured. I had an ultrasound last year due to frequent urinating and result showed minimal calcification a year back. The Radiologist told me that the calcification has nothing to worry as it was not that serious and my doctor (internal medicine) also did not care about it. But I am still worried as what I have read is that even at a young age you can have prostate cancer. Though I am still experiencing frequent urination (I am now drinking a lot of water 2 to 3 liters a day) now, my creatinine is in normal level and KUB is all normal.

#

Hi,

Welcome to icliniq.com.

I have gone through your query. It is extremely unlikely for you to develop prostate cancer at your age. Even in families with hereditary prostate cancer, the usual age people develop cancer is above 40 years of age at the lowest, though it is usually between 50 to 60 years. That said, in your case, it is too early to jump to conclusions of having prostate cancer in your family. The most likely explanation for your symptoms could be a mild urinary tract infection or even your increased fluid intake. Prostatic calcification is commonly seen and does not imply anything significant to worry now. If you are concerned, you can do a PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test and a prostate exam at 40 years. If normal, then you can repeat it after three years interval.

For more information consult an urologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/urologist

Thank you doctor,

But is prostatic calcification not one of the symptoms of prostate cancer?

#

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

The concretions seen are in the peripheral part of the gland, they are very small and do not cause any symptoms. These stones do not cause prostatitis, rather they indicate that you may have had an attack of prostatitis, which also explains your heterogeneous echotexture on ultrasound (attachment removed to protect patient identity).

For more information consult an urologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/urologist

Thank you doctor,

Should I go back to my doctor and talk about it more or just leave it for now?

#

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

You can safely wait for now. It would be necessary for you to visit your doctor only if you get any urinary symptoms.

For more information consult an urologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/urologist

Thank you doctor,

So far I am not experiencing any pain. Are these stones mostly seen in a peripheral zone? And is it fine just to leave them? As what I learned is that most of the stones really do not need any treatment.

#

Hi,

Welcome back to icliniq.com.

These calcification or concretions are mostly seen in the peripheral areas only. This type of stones does not cause any symptoms at all.

For more information consult an urologist online --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/urologist


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