Dental & Oral Health

Post Extraction Instructions for Children and Adults

Written by
Dr. Nivedita Dalmia
and medically reviewed by iCliniq medical review team.

Published on Apr 07, 2015 and last reviewed on Jul 19, 2019   -  4 min read

Abstract

Abstract

It is very important to maintain a good oral hygiene after tooth extraction. This article discusses in detail the instructions to be followed after tooth extraction.

Post Extraction Instructions for Children and Adults

After tooth extraction, it is crucial for the blood clot to form and start the healing process. For this, post-extraction instructions should be carefully followed, otherwise, it will lead to swelling of the face, bleeding from the socket, infections, etc.

Post-Extraction Instructions for Kids (Milk Tooth)

Things To Do

  • After half an hour of extraction, remove the cotton pack from the extraction site.

  • Give one painkiller tablet, if required give another painkiller tablet after 12 hours.

  • Give an ice cream to eat, give only plain ice cream without any choco chips, nuts, etc. Let the child have the ice cream with a spoon.

  • Keep a watch on the child until the anesthesia effect goes off. Because children might bite their lips or tongue due to numbness.

  • Keep a watch on the child as they tend to put pencil tips, pen tips, etc., into the extraction socket.

  • Give juice or milk in a glass.

  • Give liquid or semi-solid food for 24 hours after the extraction.

  • The child can be allowed to brush the teeth the next day.

Things To Avoid

Post-Extraction Instructions for Adults

Things To Do

  • After half an hour of extraction, remove the cotton pack from the extraction site.

  • Have a cup of ice cream without choco chips and nuts because they might get lodged into the extraction site.

  • If you are diabetic, then have a glass of cold water or milk.

  • Immediately after the extraction, apply ice or cold pack from outside, it will cause vasoconstriction and decreased swelling.

  • Keep drinking water; it will keep you hydrated.

  • Have liquid or semi-solid food for 24 hrs.

  • If there is pain, have a painkiller tablet.

  • Brush your teeth after 24 hours of extraction.

  • If you had stopped Ecosprin prior to extraction, consult your physician and start the medication again.

  • If you are on any kind of medication, consult the physician and follow as they advise.

  • Take the antibiotics and pain medication as prescribed by the dentist.

  • After 24 hours of extraction, start doing lukewarm saline mouth rinse 3 to 4 times daily, it will help in the healing of the socket.

  • If sutures were placed, get it removed from the dentist after 7 days.

  • Start chewing food from the extraction side after 3 to 4 days. Earlier you start eating from that side, the better.

Things To Avoid

  • Do not spit and gargle for the next 24 hours of extraction; whatever blood oozes out, swallow it with saliva because spitting will lead to bleeding.

  • Avoid eating hot or spicy food for 24 hours.

  • No smoking and drinking alcohol or soda for the next 7 days.

  • Avoid the use of straw while having cold drinks, it leads to dislodgement of the blood clot.

  • Do not eat anything till the anesthesia effect is present, you might tend to bite your lips or tongue.

  • Do not place another cotton pack at the extraction site, as it will lead to infection and delayed healing.

  • Do not stop any medication by yourself, as that may lead to medical problems.

  • Do not give hot compression from outside, it will lead to swelling.

Post-Extraction Complications

If you fail at post-extraction care, it increases the risk of post-extraction complications. The possible complications are:

1. Prolonged bleeding - The bleeding can last from 8 to 72 hours after the extraction. If you are still bleeding profusely after 12 hours, consult your dentist.

2. Dry socket (Alveolitis) - If the blood clot formed in the extraction site gets dislodged, it results in a dry socket. It is extremely painful. The clot can dislodge if you use a straw, gargle forcefully, spit after extraction, or smoke.

3. Infection - If the extraction site gets contaminated, it can result in the spread of infection. Always take antibiotics if your dentist prescribed them.

4. Bruising - Bruising is bleeding under the skin, which occurs when the small blood vessels get damaged. It is a very common complication.

5. Trismus - Restricted mouth opening after extraction is called trismus.

6. Swelling - Depending on how traumatic the extraction was, the extent of swelling will vary. If the bone had to be drilled to remove the tooth, the swelling will be more. To avoid this, place ice packs after getting your tooth extracted, and do not eat anything hot for 24 hours.

7. Osteomyelitis - Bacterial infection of the bone. Your dentist will prescribe antibiotics for this.

8. Osteonecrosis - Lack of blood supply can lead to the death of bone cells called osteonecrosis.

When to See a Dentist?

You might have pain and bleed up to 24 hours after the extraction. And you might also have swelling, but if you have the following signs or symptoms, consult your dentist:

  • Fever and chills.

  • Vomiting.

  • Profuse bleeding and pain even after 4 hours.

  • Severe swelling.

  • Foul-smelling discharge from the extraction site.

  • Shortness of breath.

  • Chest pain.

  • Severe nausea.

Consult a dentist online for queries regarding oral hygiene maintenance after tooth extraction --> https://www.icliniq.com/ask-a-doctor-online/dentist

Last reviewed at:
19 Jul 2019  -  4 min read

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