Radiation Exposure

Radiation is an energy that is produced in the form of particles or waves. It is produced naturally by sunlight, and it is also produced by humans during X-rays, cancer treatments, and in nuclear facilities. Long-term exposure to a small amount of radiation causes gene mutations and increases the risk of developing cancer. Brief exposure for a longer period causes radiation sickness. The symptoms are nausea, skin burns, and reduced organ function. In severe cases, it leads to death.

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All the answers published in this website are written by Verified medical doctors, therapists and health experts. The Content has been moderated by iCliniq medical review team before publication. Post your medical clarifications on iCliniq by choosing the right specialty and get them answered. Your medical queries will be answered 24/7 by top doctors from iCliniq.

Will CT chest and IV contrast done multiple times cause cancer?

Query: Hi doctor, I suffer from tachycardia post covid for two weeks. I had a nuclear stress test with Lexiscan as I could not able to do treadmill. After a week, I did a chest CT with IV contrast for knowing whether I have a blood clot or not. Now I have overcome anxiety developed due to high radiation e...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. Radiation exposure from diagnostic images causes a small increased risk of developing cancer. It is much more significant in children and it is less in adults. There are many factors in radiation exposure that is responsible for the development of cancer. The small radi...  Read Full »

Does watching esophagus manometry affect the eyes?

Query: Hi doctor,I have a question about radiation. I had an esophageal manometry with high resolution together with a video scan of the esophagus. I was in a high flat bed and had contrast-liquid while they looked at my esophagus emptying that is swallowing process. They of course used as a small dose ...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. The radiation is focused on the location of study and therefore the x-ray emitted was towards your esophagus. Your eyes were safe and did not receive harmful levels of radiation. The nurse is supposed to wear the glasses because she attends many procedures on a daily basi...  Read Full »

Can radiations from PET and CT scan affect other family members?

Query: Hello doctor, Over two years ago my eldest son was diagnosed with lymphoma. He had PET scans and CT scans. These started at the end of my last pregnancy and went on while my son was a newborn and infant. I do not remember him holding the baby, but he came home from scans and was around him. They...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. I have read through your query in detail. Please find my observations below. Your baby is totally safe. There is radiation risk only when doing PET and CT scans. The risk is only to the patient, which means your eldest son in your case. Your newborn was never exposed to ...  Read Full »

I had a hip X-ray of 35 mAs. How many more mSv have I received? Was I overexposed?

Query: Hello doctor, I had a hip X-ray of 35 mAs. An average hip x-ray is supposed to be 20 mAs/.07 mSv. So if my hip x-ray was 35 mAs, how many more mSv have I received? Was I overexposed?  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. The x-ray power output depends on mAs (milliampere-seconds) and kVp (kilovoltage peak) parameters. The average hip x-ray can be done at about 20 to 30 mAs and 70 to 80 KVp. The general rule is that the percentage increase in mAs causes a similar increase in radiation...  Read Full »

Can a CT scan of the pelvis affect my eggs?

Query: Hello doctor, I had a lower GI and pelvic CT scan with contrast done at the age of 36 years. I fly a lot. I want kids. Did this scan harm my eggs or increase my chances of developing cancer? Nothing was found in the scan, and the MSV was 8.  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. I have read through your query in detail. Please find my observations below. The contrast CT scan pelvis has exposed you to radiation of 8 mSv as recorded on the machine. For a 36 year old female patient, this means you are exposed to an additional cancer risk of 0.09 ...  Read Full »

I had a dental scan possibly on the day I conceived. Should I be worried?

Query: Hi doctor, I had a dental scan the week I conceived my baby or possibly the day I conceived. Should I be worried?  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. The dose of radiation in a dental X-ray is very less and approximately 0.01 mSv. This will not cause any significant harm if you got X-ray done on the day you might have conceived. Please avoid X-rays during the pregnancy.   Read Full »

How to calculate the radiation dose from three scout scans?

Query: Hello doctor, I had a CT scan of the chest and abdomen. What is odd about this scan is that the technician did three scout scans before the final helical scan, which made me uncomfortable because I do not know how much radiation I received in those scans. When I got the CD, I looked at the dose repo...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hello, Welcome to icliniq.com. I have seen the reports (attachment removed to protect patient identity). From calculations, the total radiation dose received by you during the CT scan is likely 10 mSv. Please note that scout images give low dose and three scout images will not significantly increas...  Read Full »

What is the safety limit for CT scans?

Query: Hi, I am a 31 year old male. I would like to know how many CTscans - abdomen and pelvis are safe in a 2 months time. I have had CT scan abdomen and pelvis 2 months back in another city, but now a doctor here wants it done again as I do not have the reports. Is it safe? What is the safety limit for ...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. Every CT scan abdomen and pelvis will give you a radiation exposure of approximately 14 mSv which means it gives a risk of 0.16 percent to develop cancer. This means 99.86 percent chance that it will not cause cancer. If you get another CT scan abdomen and pelvis done now...  Read Full »

Will I get cancer as a result of CT scan?

Query: Hi doctor, I am a 50 year old male. My height is 5'11" and weight is 170 lbs. I do not have any major health issue, but my brother and mother had recently come down with leukemia. Recently had a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis repeated with and without contrast material. Before four years, I also ...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. The recent computed tomography (CT) scan of abdomen and pelvis has a radiation dose of 12.366 mSv which means it is causing an additional cancer risk of 0.06 percent. This is quite low and not a reason to get worried. The radiation dose from the three CT scans for kidney ...  Read Full »

Am I likely to develop cancer after having multiple CT and MRI scans?

Query: Hi doctor, I am 29 years old. Within six months of having a delivery, I have done a head CT, and three chest CT studies to rule out PE. My first PE study was done with a protective shielding on my chest to reduce the radiation to my breasts. I did not have any shielding on my second study. During m...  Read Full »


Dr. Vivek Chail

Family Physician, General Practitioner, Radiodiagnosis Physician, Radiologist

Answer: Hi, Welcome to icliniq.com. CT of the head might have given you two mSv radiation. CT of the abdomen and pelvis might have given you 14 mSv radiation. CT scan of the chest might have given you 45 mSv radiation. The total radiation dose received approximately is 61 mSv. You might have an additional...  Read Full »

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